Category Archives: Hardware

Audio staggering in Windows 10

Update:

There are now two better solutions:

1. Disable dynamic tick

  1. Open Command prompt (Admin) to bring up elevated command prompt.
  2. Type BCDEDIT /SET DISABLEDYNAMICTICK YES command and press Enter to fix the high DPC latency
  3. restart the computer

2. Install and use TCP optimizer:

  1. Download TCP optimizer
  2. Set settings to optimal
  3. restart the computer

If the above does not work, you can try the older solutions mentioned below.

Continue reading Audio staggering in Windows 10

Monitor color calibration

  • Photo Friday — Photo Friday is a simple web page that is designed to help you calibrate the brightness and contrast of your screen. Just adjust the monitor settings until the transition of tones from black to white is clearly distinguishable on the screen.
  • Online Monitor Test — Online Monitor Test is one of the better calibration websites out there. It is lined with a slew of interactive tests to help you adjust your monitor’s screen colors and to see if your monitor can produce smooth gradients. There are also tools for pinpointing damaged pixels and backlight bleeding, rendering the website one of the more robust web-based calibration tools to date.
  • The Lagom LCD Monitor Test Pages — The Lagom LCD Monitor Test Pages are handy, both online and offline. The website not only allows you to adjust various things such as contrast and response time, but it also allows you to download the images as a 120KB zip file, so you can check any monitor in-store that you are thinking about purchasing.

Multiboot: BIOS+MBR vs UEFI + GTP

Acronyms:

  • BIOS: Basic Input Output System
  • UEFI: Unified Extensible Firmware Interface
  • MBR: Master boot record
  • GPT: Globally Unique Identifier Partition Table = GUID Partition Table

Multiboot configuration

The most effective combinations are either BIOS+MBR or UEFI+GPT. You could go around that, but it is not recommended at all.

The most compatible combination is

UEFI + GPT + Fast startup disabled + Secure boot disabled

If manufacturers stay sound, Secure boot will keep working with most Linux distributions but the future is unknown.

The steps are:

  1. Install any windows version you want as usual and install in UEFI mode
  2. disable Secure boot
  3. disable Fast startup
  4. download rufus and create a bootable USB drive (links: #1 #2)
  5. boot with the USB drive.
  6. make sure that Ubuntu installer can detect that Windows OS is already installed
  7. install Ubuntu (or any other linux version)

If the linux installer is unable to detect windows, you should NOT proceed. You should make sure that if Windows are installed in UEFI mode the linux installer boots in UEFI mode and if Windows are installed in BIOS mode the linux installer boots in BIOS mode.

A detailed guide for multibooting is here:

Other questions …

BIOS vs UEFI FAQ:

  1. Official UEFI FAQ
  2. UEFI vs BIOS

MBR vs GPT FAQ:

  1. Check to see if you have MBR or GTP (Windows OS)
  2. Convert MBR to GTP (Windows OS)
  3. How EUFI works
  4. Basic disks vs Dynamic disks

 

Recommended settings for 802.11n

Here are the official recommended settings for Wifi 802.11n from Intel:

Property Value
802.11n channel width for band 2.4 Auto (not in 20 MHz only)
802.11n channel width for band 5.2 Auto (not in 20 MHz only)
802.11n mode Enabled
Fat channel intolerant Disabled
Roaming aggressiveness Medium (or less)
Throughput enhancement Disabled
Transmit power Highest
Wireless mode 802.11a/b/g
HT mode VHT mode

On the wireless router, check the following options:

Property Value
Auto channel scan Enable
802.11 mode Use 802.11n only
Channel width 40 MHz

References:

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/network-and-i-o/wireless-networking/000005544.html