Category Archives: Linux

xbindkeys configuration

Setup:

  1. mouse side button 8 sends Enter
  2. mouse side button 9 sends alt+left
  3. tilde sends ctrl+w

 

Installation:

sudo apt-get install xautomation
sudo apt-get install x11-utils
sudo apt-get install xdotool

To find the keycodes run xev or xbindkeys -k:

xev
xbindkeys - k

Here is a sample script:

#send alt+left on side button 9
"xte 'keydown Alt_L' 'key Left' 'keyup Alt_L'"
   b:9

#send Enter on side button 8
"xte 'key Return'"
   b:8

#Using keycodes
"xte 'keydown Control_L' 'key w' 'keyup Control_L'"
    grave + release

 

References:

Unable to use ctrl+shift+? shortcuts with keyboard layout switcher

You have a Linux distribution with Xorg and you have configured the keyboard layout switcher to use alt+shift to switch between languages. But once you do that, keyboard shortcuts that use alt+shift+<key> combinations cannot be used. The same could happen if you have selected ctrl+shift as a shortcut to change language which disables all ctrl+shift+<key> combinations.

Continue reading Unable to use ctrl+shift+? shortcuts with keyboard layout switcher

Clock messed up when dual booting

The problem:

  • Linux store the time on the hardware clock as UTC by default
  • Windows store the time on the hardware clock as the local time by default

Since both operating systems access the hardware clock you may encounter problems when you dual boot between them.

A comment for the geeks:

The advantage of having the hardware clock as UTC is that you don’t need to change the hardware clock when moving between timezones or when Daylight Savings Time (DST) begins or ends as UTC does not have DST or timezone offsets. Continue reading Clock messed up when dual booting

Mint 19 Setup Tutorial 🏅

Basic installation

1 – Preparation and installation

  1. Download rufus
  2. Download latest stable cinnamon version ISO
  3. Use Rufus to create a bootable USB
  4. Boot the system with the USB. You can try to press F10 while booting in order to activate the boot menu. If it does not work you will have to enter the BIOS (you should google for the keyboard shortcut according to the manufacturer).

⚠️ Warning ⚠️

If you have Windows already installed, Linux might not be able to detect the previous installation, You should make sure that Windows and Linux use the same mode (either BIOS or UEFI). See multiboot article for more. Always double check you are using the same mode when you multi-boot.

If windows are detected properly or you are not using Windows at all, you can install Mint and proceed to the next steps.

Continue reading Mint 19 Setup Tutorial 🏅